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Welcome to the website of Lyttelton Museum.

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Welcome to the website of Lyttelton Museum.

Male figurehead being rescused from quake-damaged Lyttelton Museum. c. Lyttelton Museum collection.

Male figurehead being rescused from quake-damaged Lyttelton Museum. c. Lyttelton Museum collection.

Welcome to Lyttelton Museum's website.

Since 1968, Lyttelton Museum has been a home for some of the history of the Lyttelton Harbour area.

We are currently closed because our building was demolished after the Canterbury earthquakes. However, our extensive collection was rescued during a series of daring emergency recovery operations by the Lyttelton Volunteer Fire Brigade and staff from the Air Force Museum of New Zealand (AFMNZ) and our collection is safely stored away.

We are working towards a new museum building for Lyttelton and we want your support and your involvement. See Building News to keep up to date. Alternatively,  like us on Facebook, become a member, and keep an eye out for our pop-up exhibitions around Lyttelton.

Building News

ANOTHER STEP TOWARDS A NEW MUSEUM FOR LYTTELTON

33 and 35 London St, which we hope will become the site of the new museum building. Photographer:Peter Rough

33 and 35 London St, which we hope will become the site of the new museum building. Photographer:Peter Rough

LHMS has chosen Christchurch firm of architects Warren & Mahoney to work with it on the new museum building.

‘We’re excited to be involved because we see this as being really important for Lyttelton and the harbour area,’ says Graeme Finlay, who will be the lead architect and has strong personal links to Lyttelton Harbour Whakaraupō. Graeme adds that among the team working on the museum project is Fiona Short. ‘Last year, Fiona won a gold award at the National Awards of the New Zealand Institute of Architects for a multi-residential complex on which she was the project architect. She was one of the youngest architects ever to get that award.’

Fiona sees the new museum as providing a real catalyst in Lyttelton’s cultural landscape. ‘I want the museum to be more than a building which stores and exhibits objects – it can engage with the community to share and celebrate their stories.’

‘We approached five architectural firms,’ says Peter Rough, Chair of the LHMS development team. ‘All were strong contenders, but Warren & Mahoney’s proposal stood out.’

We hope to hear in May about the site in London St but in the meantime LHMS will work with Warren & Mahoney to develop a building brief. ‘We’re at the start of that process,’ says Peter. ‘Before the architects can begin to design a building for us, they need to understand what our practical requirements are, as well as how we want to use the spaces. We’re looking forward to working with Graeme and his team.’

 

 

London Street, 1912. c. Lyttelton Museum collection.

Oxford Street, c. 1980. c. Lyttelton Museum collection.

Godley Quay Rowing Club, 1924. c. Lyttelton Museum collection.